CORE Pathway2019-05-29T16:06:39-05:00

CORE Pathway

Not all students know what they want to be when they grow up by the time they get to high school, and that’s okay!

The CORE Pathway combines courses from various academic disciplines that are typically aligned to general education requirements.

The CORE Pathway is designed for students who haven’t decided on a specific area of interest, or may not know where to start.

Students have the opportunity to build core skills and gain competence in communication (written and oral), reasoning, critical thinking, collaboration and computer proficiency.

Available: Online and On-Ground

Total Credit Hours: 18 – 24

This course focuses on the principles of using writing for thinking, as well as a tool for expressing ideas. It addresses the composing process, research and documentation, and rhetorical strategies for various audiences and purposes. Students develop their communicative, evaluative, critical thinking, and research writing abilities.

Pre-Reqs: ENGL 106 or Qualifying score on the ERAU English Skills Assessment

Credit Hours: 3

This course emphasizes writing, reading and appreciation skills. Reading materials include selected novels, poems, and plays.

Pre-Reqs: ENGL 123

Credit Hours: 3

Students are required to already have an understanding of traditional computer-based applications before beginning CSCI 109. These applications include word processing, basic spreadsheet use, basic database use, basic presentation software use, electronic mail, and accessing web resources via the Internet. The purpose of this course is to build on students’ existing knowledge of using computer systems and pertinent applications. Students will increase their skills with the most popular computer applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, electronic mail, presentation software, and Internet. Computer literacy is presented through lectures, discussions, and readings on the computer process, the impact of computers on society, emerging technologies, and hardware and software purchasing decisions.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a continuation of the study of communication and communication theory, with an emphasis on overcoming communication apprehension, developing listening skills, mastering oral performance and writing about communication. Individual sections may focus on public speaking, group discussion, oral interpretation or interpersonal communication.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

Choose one course from each area below to complete your pathway.

This course focuses on fundamentals of exponents, radicals, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions, graphing techniques, and complex numbers. It includes an introduction to function, curve sketching, elementary theory of equations, sequences and series, matrix algebra and systems of equations, linear, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, inverse and composite functions, variation, and systems of equations.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 106 or Qualifying score on the ERAU Mathematics Skills Assessment

Credit Hours: 3

Students will be introduced to trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities; radian measure with applications; compound, half and double angle identities; solving elementary trigonometric equations, right and oblique triangles, law of sines and cosines; inverse trigonometric functions; vectors and trigonometric form of a complex number.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 111 or MATH 140 or Qualifying score on the Mathematics Skills Assessment

Credit Hours: 3

This is a precalculus course with an emphasis on functions and their graphs, including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric; radian measure; trigonometric identities and equations; vectors, parametric and polar curves; sequences and series; binomial theorem.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 106 or MATH 111 or MATH 140 or Qualifying score on the Mathematics Skills Assessment

Credit Hours: 3

This is a survey course in meteorology that includes applications to flight. Included is a systematic development of the following topics: the composition and general structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy transfer, seasonal and daily controls on temperature, pressure, wind, local and regional circulations, atmospheric stability, vertical motion, turbulence, moisture, fog, clouds, precipitation, icing, the general circulation pattern, climate, jet streams, air masses, fronts, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical cyclones, thunderstorms, and weather observations and charts.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

A biological science course introducing the fundamentals of biology and essential structures, components, and processes of life. Emphasis placed on biochemistry; cell structure, function, organization, and division; sources and uses of biological energy; as well as genetics and inheritance.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

Fundamentals of general chemistry to include basic nomenclature of inorganic compounds, stoichiometry, atomic structure to include quantum numbers and electron configurations, periodic relationships, chemical bonding and chemical reactions (including oxidation-reduction reactions), molecular geometry, states of matter including properties of gases, principles of solution, and an introduction to chemical thermodynamics and organic chemistry. The laboratory includes both qualitative and quantitative work.

Co-Reqs: CHEM 141 – General Chemistry I Lab (1 Credit)

Credit Hours: 3 (4 with Lab)

Survey course in elementary physics. Stress will be placed on basic concepts, principles, and history of the development of physics. Presentation will include selected topics in mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, and magnetism, and modern physics.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 106 or MATH 111 or MATH 140 or MATH 142 or MATH 143 or MATH 241

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the history of America in the 20th century, the course emphasizes the explosive growth of aviation as a major influence upon the economic, military, and societal development of the United States.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

This course will introduce the student to the field of psychology and is a survey of the bio-psychosocial continuum and the intra-psychic, interpersonal, and organizational factors affecting human behavior. A primary feature of the course is its focus on the scientific method as the route to psychological knowledge. Students examine the rationalist, empiricist and experimental foundations of the scientific method and how these foundations can be critiqued. Topics include sensation, perception, learning, motivation, emotion, memory, personality, psychopathology, physiological psychology and social processes. Emphasis is placed on the application of the basic principles of psychology to engineering, aviation, public policy, and business.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

Students are provided an integrated survey of the fundamental concepts of culture, forms of collective behavior, community and social organization, social interaction, and social change. The social effects of aviation and the impact of science on the social order living in an air age will also be investigated.

Pre-Reqs: None

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the economic principles of free enterprise supply and demand, private and social implications of revenue maximization, cost minimization, profit maximization, market structure, and resource markets. Current microeconomic issues in aviation (such as elasticity, pricing, taxes, subsidies, market implications, liability reform, evolution of airline completion, etc.) are discussed.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 111 or MATH 140 or MATH 143 or MATH 241 and ENGL 123 or ENGL 143

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introductory analysis of employment, inflation, recession, GDP economic growth, national income/output and international trade with an emphasis on practical policy alternatives. Macroeconomic aviation applications such as the counter-cyclical growth of start-up airlines and consideration of ATC privatization are incorporated.

Pre-Reqs: MATH 111 or MATH 140 or MATH 143 or MATH 241 and ENGL 123 or ENGL 143

Credit Hours: 3